Meet Dr. Valerie Whitney, Assistant Professor of Horn

  Photo: Valerie Whitney

Photo: Valerie Whitney

The UBC School of Music is pleased to announce that Dr. Valerie Whitney will join the faculty as Assistant Professor of Horn, starting in the 2018-19 academic year.

"We are delighted to welcome Dr. Valerie Whitney as she joins our faculty. Valerie is an accomplished and versatile performer, and an adept and knowledgeable teacher, and our brass faculty are enthusiastic to support the new energies and initiatives she will bring to brass studies at UBC," said Dr. Richard Kurth, Director of the School of Music.

A graduate of Wheaton College and Northwestern University, Dr. Whitney regularly appears with some of the nation’s most esteemed performing organizations, including the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the Chicago Lyric Opera, and the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra. She joined the South Bend Symphony as Third Horn in 2017, after serving the orchestra as Assistant Horn for five years. She also holds the fourth horn position with the Lake Forest Symphony in Lake Forest, Illinois, and is a member of the Millar Brass Ensemble and the Chicago Philharmonic Orchestra Society. 

WATCH: Dr. Valerie Whitney performs David Sampson's Sonata No. 40


Dr. Whitney will play a leading role in the brass division at the School of Music. Her duties will include undergraduate and graduate studio instruction, brass chamber music coaching and coordination, and brass curriculum leadership — all while working in partnership with our accomplished team of VSO principals and other top professionals in the city.

"Valerie will be a wonderful colleague for all full-time, adjunct, and sessional faculty members in the Winds Brass and Percussion Division, and I'm thrilled that she is joining us!" said division chair Dr. Robert Taylor.

“I am delighted to join the UBC family, and excited to work alongside the excellent faculty and students to further the exceptional learning environment in the School of Music. I look forward to joining the campus activities and the broader UBC community in the Fall!” Dr. Whitney said.

Audiences in Vancouver will have the opportunity to see Dr. Whitney perform live during the upcoming School of Music concert season. On Nov. 21st she and other members of the School of Music faculty will perform Dohnanyi’s Sextet in C major, Op. 37 for Piano, Clarinet, Horn and String Trio at Roy Barnett Recital Hall. Dr. Whitney will perform a solo concert on Jan. 23rd, 2018, also at Barnett Hall. Both concerts are part of the Wednesday Noon Hour concert series.

Welcome to UBC, Valerie!


ABOUT VALERIE WHITNEY

Valerie Whitney has been performing in and around the Chicagoland area for over a decade. She regularly appears with some of the nation’s most esteemed performing organizations, including the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the Chicago Lyric Opera, and the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra.

In 2010, she was invited to serve as guest principal horn with The Florida Orchestra for two weeks. From 2013-2016, she served as hornist of Fifth House Ensemble, during which time she performed and led masterclasses at nationwide universities as well as educational programs in various Chicago public schools and community centers. In 2017, Dr. Whitney was the first candidate to earn a DMA in Horn Performance from Northwestern University. She is a graduate of Wheaton College and Northwestern University.

Dr. Whitney joined the South Bend Symphony as Third Horn in 2017, after serving the orchestra as Assistant Horn for five years. She also holds the fourth horn position with the Lake Forest Symphony in Lake Forest, Illinois, and is a member of the Millar Brass Ensemble and the Chicago Philharmonic Orchestra Society.  

High Notes | Spring 2018 Edition

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Welcome to the Spring 2018 edition of High Notes

In this issue, we talk to sound ecologist Hildegard Westerkamp (BMus'72) about technology, gender, and "trusting your inner voice." We showcase the School of Music's rare and beautiful "Zell" harpsichord, newly renovated thanks to a generous donor. And we learn about a new book project from School of Music faculty and alumni that is shining a light on important women composers from the Middle Ages until today. 
 

Also in the issue:

  • Mezzo-soprano Debi Wong on opera's potential to open up space for underrepresented groups

  • Winter ConcertsProkofiev's Peter and the Wolf, Bach's St John Passion, and Sanglots: Chansons of Love and Loss, featuring works by Bizet, Fauré, Poulenc and more.

  • In Pictures: Highlights from UBC Opera's 2017–18 season

  • Research & Publications: "Urban Processional Culture and the Soundscapes of Post-Reformation Germany," Viennese and Italian opera in the 19th century, plus new symposia from the Rhythm and Research Cluster

  • Alumni Making Waves: A Juno nomination, world premieres, and new orchestra positions

  • Beyond the GatesAssistant Professor Jonathan Girard named a 2018–19 Wall Scholar, Prof. Nancy Hermiston honoured for her contributions to opera, and Sessional Instructor Jocelyn Morlock wins a Juno Award

  • Catching Up with Our Students: Awards, publications, and highlights from the ethnomusicology program

  • New RecordingsWorks by Keith Hamel, Dorothy Chang, Stephen Chatman, Alan Matheson and more

As always, we want to hear from you! Send us your comments and story ideas.

 

 Kiran Bhumber demonstrates her Responsive User Body Suit.  Photo courtesy of Kiran Bhumber

Kiran Bhumber demonstrates her Responsive User Body Suit. Photo courtesy of Kiran Bhumber

 

A studio of one’s own: Innovators Hildegard Westerkamp (BMus'72) and Kiran Bhumber (BMus'14) on tech, gender, and 'trusting your inner voice' 

When Hildegard Westerkamp looks back on her decades-long career as an experimental composer and sound ecologist, she marvels at how much music production has changed. During her student days, there were no computer screens, no visualizers, no such thing as ‘digital.’ Everything was analogue and you relied solely on your ear as you edited. She remembers working in her studio, surrounded by pieces of audio reel that she had cut, marked, and hung up for quick reference until they could be spliced — literally taped together — into ambitious compositions that embraced unpredictability, marrying music, found sounds, and field recordings.

Her chosen instrument — the sounds of the environment — and the limitations of the technology available at the time necessitated deep listening and spurred creativity: “I tried to find the musicality in the sounds that I had recorded,” Westerkamp says. 

In so doing she helped pioneer the field of ‘sound ecology.’

Read the full story

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Rethinking the canon: Dr. Laurel Parsons on overlooked women composers

  Dr. Laurel Parsons (right) and Dr. Brenda Ravenscroft (left)

Dr. Laurel Parsons (right) and Dr. Brenda Ravenscroft (left)

UBC sessional instructor Dr. Laurel Parsons (MA’91, PhD’03) and McGill University’s Dr. Brenda Ravenscroft (PhD’93) are the editors of Analytical Essays on Music by Women Composers, a four-volume series of essays devoted to the study of music written by women composers. The first volume, which features essays on concert music composed between 1960 and 2000, recently won the Society for Music Theory’s 2018 award for the Outstanding Multi-Author Publication. With the release of the second volume fast approaching, we sat down with Parsons to discuss the project.

How did the project come about?

I did my dissertation on the music of Elisabeth Lutyens, who was a British composer. I started reading about how influential she was on British music of the time, but I couldn’t find anything more specific about how she was influential. I decided I would explore her music for my dissertation. At the same time, I started noticing how few papers there were on music by women. After tracking this for many years, it became clear to me that we had to do something to improve the representation of composers who were women in our discipline.

Read the full story

Top

 


 Alexander Weimann performs on the harpsichord.  Photo: Takumi Hayashi

Alexander Weimann performs on the harpsichord. Photo: Takumi Hayashi

 

The Gift of Music: Unveiling the School of Music's rare, newly refurbished harpsichord

This March, the School of Music unveiled one of the jewels of our instrument collection: a newly renovated double-manual harpsichord modeled on an 18th-century German original. Harpsichordist Alexander Weimann, along with violinist Chloe Meyers and viola da gamba player Natalie Mackie, showcased the new addition with a special concert at Roy Barnett Recital Hall featuring the works of German Baroque composers.

“Bach, Muffat, Buxtehude and Schmeltzer — it was the perfect repertoire, I think, to demonstrate what makes the instrument such an important and beautiful addition to the School,” says Professor Alex Fisher, who helped organize the renovation and the concert. 

Craftsman Craig Tomlinson built the harpsichord by hand in the 1980s, based on the original German design by Christian Zell (1728) that is preserved today in the Museum of Arts and Crafts in Hamburg. Celebrated for its rich sound and variety of different tone colours, Tomlinson’s masterful replica had begun to show its age and needed some significant improvements.

A generous donation by Marlene Yemchuk, in honour of her son David Yemchuk (B.Sc. 2010), made the renovation possible.

Read the full story

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"You don't have to fit into a box": Mezzo-soprano Debi Wong (BMus'08) on opera's potential to open up space for underrepresented groups

 Debi Wong.  Photo courtesy of the artist

Debi Wong. Photo courtesy of the artist

Mezzo soprano Debi Wong (BMus’08) believes that opera has the potential to establish a dialogue about underrepresented groups but all too often it goes unrealized. Even at major houses like the Metropolitan Opera, modern productions are still trapped in traditions and tropes which she says can have consequences for our society.

“If we are always telling the story about the woman in distress and the man who saves her, does that affect our cultural values?” she asks. Wong’s adaptation of Acis and Galatea premiere in September brought that question directly to Vancouver audiences.

In the production Wong played the character Acis, who in the original opera is a shepherd in love with Galatea, a nymph, and the two are persecuted for their love by the god Polyphemus. By changing one character’s gender and the mythical elements of Handel’s pastoral opera, Wong sought to create a space for the LGBTQ community in opera and make it more accessible to modern audiences.

Read the full story

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Winter concerts available on Livestream

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Watch the latest performances by the School of Music’s large and small ensembles on Livestream:

St John PassionOur grand, season-ending concert features an epic performance of the Bach masterpiece by UBC Choirs and Symphony Orchestra.

Peter and the Wolf: UBC Symphony Orchestra performs the Prokofiev classic, along with Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite and selections from Satie and Poulenc. With guest appearance by UBC President Prof. Santa J. Ono as Narrator.

Sanglots: Chansons of Love and Loss (Part 1 | Part 2): Terence Dawson, piano, and J. Patrick Raftery, voice, perform beautiful and melancholy works by Bizet, Fauré, Duparc, Barber and Poulenc.

MOMENTmusic: UBC Symphonic Winds and Concert Winds perform works by John Philip Sousa, Frank Ticheli, David Maslanka, Ira Hearshen, and Aaron Copland 

Browse more of our recent concerts

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In Pictures: UBC Opera's 2017–18 season

The 2017–18 season was a busy one for UBC Opera, with ambitious productions of Gluck's Orfeo ed Euridice and Rossini's La Cenerentola, as well the annual Opera Ball fundraisers. Click on the image to load the slideshow:

 Scene from UBC Opera's  Orfeo ed Euridice.   Photo: Tim Matheson

Scene from UBC Opera's Orfeo ed Euridice. Photo: Tim Matheson


New research and publications

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Professor Alexander Fisher contributed a chapter entitled "'Mit singen und klingen': Urban Processional Culture and the Soundscapes of Post-Reformation Germany" to In Listening to Early Modern Catholicism, edited by Daniele V. Filippi and Michael Noone, 187-203. Leiden: Brill, 2017.

Professor John Roeder gave a keynote address, entitled “Comparing Musical Cycles Across the World,” at the 2018 Rocky Mountain Music Scholars Conference in Tucson, Arizona. He gave two talks at the Society for Music Theory’s annual conference: “Interactions of Folk Melody and Transformational (Dis)continuities in Chen Yi’s Ba Ban” and “How to create meter and why.”

Assistant Professor Ève Poudrier presented a talk entitled “The Influence of Grouping and Tempo on Subjective Metricization” at the recent Auditory Perception, Cognition and Action Meeting in Vancouver this past November. 

Assistant Professor Claudio Vellutini received a UBC Hampton Endowment Research Fund New Faculty Award for his book project, “Entangled Histories: Opera and Cultural Networks between Vienna and the Italian States, 1815–1848.” He also published an essay, "Opera and Monuments: Verdi's Ernani in Vienna and the Construction of Dynastic Memory,” in the Cambridge Opera Journal.

Continue reading research and publications news

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 Jared Miller.  Photo: CBC

Jared Miller. Photo: CBC

 

Alumni Making Waves: World premieres, new orchestra positions, and a Juno nomination 

Jared Miller (BMus’10) was commissioned by the Detroit Symphony Orchestra (DSO) to create a new work inspired by classic techno music. DSO and Leonard Slatkin will perform the piece for the very first time on May 31st and June 2nd, 2018 along with works by Chopin and Stravinsky. CBC News recently profiled Jared.

In November, Stephanie Nakagawa (BMus’09, DMA’17) received a Barbara Pentland Award from the Canadian Music Centre BC for her remarkable doctoral project, The Canadian Opera Anthology for Soprano.

Fraser Walters (BMus’03) and his group The Tenors were nominated for a 2018 Juno Award in the category of Adult Contemporary Album of the Year for Christmas Together, which “captures the joy and magic of the season, combining a mix of holiday classics, contemporary favourites and original songs.” This was The Tenors' third Juno nomination — they won in the same category in 2013.

Composer and saxophonist Colin MacDonald (BMus’93) premiered The Sky Is a Clock, his ambitious, hour-long audio installation at the Roundhouse Community Centre in November 2017. Presented by Redshift Music as part of its “Sonologues” series, Colin’s piece interweaves recordings of 16 saxophones to “create a pulsating and slowly evolving texture of sound that mimics the rotation of the stars in the sky.”

Continue reading alumni news

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 Left to right: Dr. Jonathan Girard, Prof. Nancy Hermiston, Alexander Weimann

Left to right: Dr. Jonathan Girard, Prof. Nancy Hermiston, Alexander Weimann

 

Beyond the Gates

Assistant Professor and Director of Orchestras Jonathan Girard has been named a Peter Wall Institute Wall Scholar for 2018–19. As one of nine scholars “tasked with finding new approaches to critically important questions,” Dr. Girard will work with 2017 Peter Wall Institute Visiting Artist Deborah Carruthers on a graphical score for orchestra, and has plans to commission new orchestral works that explore sonic expressions of climate change.

In November, the Canadian Music Centre honoured Professor Nancy Hermiston with a Barbara Pentland Award of Excellence for the UBC Opera’s many commissions, performances, and support of Canadian music.

Sessional Instructor and harpsichordist Alexander Weimann was nominated alongside Arion Orchestre Baroque for the Juno Award for Classical Album of the Year (Large Ensemble). Their album, Rebelles Baroques, is hailed for the "clarity and freshness of [its] interpretations" and attention to detail. Weimann is the Principal Artist and Director of the School of Music's Baroque Orchestra Mentorship Program.

Continue reading faculty news

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Catching up with our students: Awards, publications, and highlights from the ethnomusicology program

 Julia Ùlehla

Julia Ùlehla

Fourth-year BMus student Kurt Ward-Theiss, baritone, and first-year BMus student Jonathan Lopez, clarinet, received bursaries from the Vancouver Welsh Men’s Choir. Kurt and Jonathan performed in the Vancouver Welsh Men’s Choir Celtic concerts on St. Patrick’s Day weekend in Maple Ridge and at Christ Church Cathedral. The Vancouver Welsh Men’s Choir Student Bursaries advance the ensemble’s mission of collaborating with and supporting youth choirs and soloists in our community.

PhD student Julia Ùlehla, Aram Bajakian (MMus’17) and their group their Dálava garnered critical praise for The Book of Transfigurations, their most recent album. The Province included Dálava on its “10 best live concerts in Vancouver” list, while The Chicago Reader’s Peter Margasak named The Book of Transfigurations one of his top 40 records of the year. The album came in at number eight. 

PhD candidate Antares Boyle won the Society for Music Theory’s prestigious SMT-40 Dissertation Fellowship for her dissertation project, “Formation and Process in Repetitive Post-Tonal Music,” which theorizes how musical segments, processes, and larger forms arise in recent post-tonal works that feature extensive varied repetition. The $3500 fellowship recognizes and fosters excellent research in music theory by helping highly qualified Ph.D. students to complete their dissertations.

Continue reading student news

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New Recordings

Two new compositions by Professor Keith Hamel — “Touch” and “Corona” — appear on Music4Eyes+Ears, a multimedia project created by pianist Megumi Masaki. The project “explores how sound, image, text and movement can interact in live performance.”

Professor Stephen Chatman released Dawn of Night (CMC Centrediscs, 2017), a collaboration with Conductor Hilary Apfelstadt and the University of Toronto’s Macmillan Singers that weds original music with the poetry of Joanna Lilley, Christina Rossetti, Sarah Teasdale, and Tara Wohlberg and others.

Sessional lecturer Alan Matheson and Wade Mikkola released the second volume of their Souvenirs project, a collection of jazz interpretations of Finnish composers, on AMK Recordings.

See all new recordings

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Do you have a story? Let us know!

If you're a UBC Music alumnus and you have news to share, please send a note to tyler.stiem@ubc.ca. We're always looking for stories for upcoming editions of High Notes and our other networks.

 

A studio of one's own

Music production has seen a huge technological shift in recent years, but what has not been as quick to change is the diversity of the people behind the soundboard. Innovators Hildegard Westerkamp (BMus'72) and Kiran Bhumber (BMus'14)  talk about tech, gender, and trusting your inner voice.


By Aryn Strickland

 Hildegard Westerkamp

Hildegard Westerkamp

When Hildegard Westerkamp (BMus'72) looks back on her decades-long career as an experimental composer and sound ecologist, she marvels at how much music production has changed. During her student days, there were no computer screens, no visualizers, no such thing as ‘digital.’ Everything was analogue and you relied solely on your ear as you edited. She remembers working in her studio, surrounded by pieces of audio reel that she had cut, marked, and hung up for quick reference until they could be spliced — literally taped together — into ambitious compositions that embraced unpredictability, merging music, found sounds, and field recordings.

Her chosen instrument — the sounds of the environment — and the limitations of the technology available at the time necessitated deep listening and spurred creativity: “I tried to find the musicality in the sounds that I had recorded,” Westerkamp says. She experimented with painstaking production techniques such as pitchshifting (that is, slowing down and speeding up the recordings), filtering and equalizing, and delay feedback among others, to achieve the effects she wanted.

In so doing she helped pioneer the field of ‘sound ecology.’

 

Hildegard Westerkamp, The Edge of Wilderness (2000)

 

Westerkamp and the other composers and producers of her generation — she cites R. Murray Schafer and Barry Truax as important influences — developed ideas and techniques that during the shift to computer-based production became standard tools in the producer’s repertoire.

“Working in the studio totally aurally then as opposed to now, where soundfiles are displayed visually on computer screens, makes an absolute world of a difference,” she says. 

Indeed, new technologies have both democratized music production and made new things possible: “Anyone can be a bedroom producer nowadays, and that is a very powerful thing in itself,” Kiran Bhumber (BMus’14), a graduate of the School of Music’s Music Technology program, says.

The up-and-coming composer, producer, and performer cut her teeth on software like Cubase and Garage Band while still in high school. At UBC she created work that wouldn’t have been possible even a decade ago, blending cutting-edge technology, visuals, and using some of the same compositional techniques Westerkamp helped to develop. In the Digital Performance Systems class (SUBclass) at UBC, Bhumber developed RUBS, the ‘Responsive User Body Suit,’ which melds composition and performance.

“I was thinking, I wonder if there is a way we can look at contact improv and use technology as a bridge between triggering a music sample or changing a visual on screen,” she says.

The RUBS suit allows performers to compose music as they move and dance on stage, touching or stroking different sensors sewn into the fabric to trigger sounds and sequences. Her innovative suit has brought her recognition from within the electronic music world with an invitation to present her work at the New Interfaces for Musical Expression Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark last year and a coveted spot at the University of Michigan to continue her work in the Masters of Media Art program there. 

“I am interested in fusing not just music but also emerging technologies, dance, interaction and visual arts together,” Bhumber says.

 

Excerpt from "Raula," a piece by Bhumber (using the RUBS bodysuit) and J.P. Carter (trumpet)

 

Westerkamp long ago made the switch to computer-based production, and she embraces some of the visual possibilities new technologies present. But she remains committed to the idea that listening — slow, deep listening  — is central to the art of composition. In installations such as Seascapes (2008), her compositions are paired with photography and sculpture by other artists. But her most visually performative works are the sound walks that she leads together with members of the Vancouver Soundwalk Collective every year around Vancouver, where she teaches people how to appreciate environmental sound. For Westerkamp, hearing is still the dominant sense.

Westerkamp, Schafer and the other members of the World Soundscape Project created soundwalks in the 1970s. Today, Vancouver New Music runs annual soundwalks open to everyone. For an hour, participants walk in silence taking in sounds that are usually written off as noise. According to Westerkamp, soundwalks do more than just teach people how to listen. “When you do that kind of listening in a safe context, inspiration emerges, new ideas emerge and when you get that inspiration you can tackle the world quite differently,” she says.

Hildegard Westerkamp, Kits Beach Soundwalk (1989)

 

Much of her time is now spent organizing and travelling to international conferences about sound ecology. “People are really interested in acoustic ecology and soundscape studies. There’s just a huge amount happening — at universities, there are many scientists who are now realizing that if they do any studies on sound they have to include the listener as an important source of perceptual information about the sound environment into their studies, into their data,” she says.

If technology has influenced the course of both Westerkamp’s and Bhumber’s development as artists, gender is another important factor. Music production and electroacoustic composition was — and remains — a male-dominated field. Although the World Soundscape Project (WSP) was a source of inspiration early in her career Westerkamp was surprised by her male colleagues attempts to relegate her to jobs at the typewriter and the photocopier. “The group consisted of five men and me. I was passionate about my research work. This and a basically good relationship with my colleagues enabled me to nip in the bud these unconscious assumptions about the work given to a woman.”

Ultimately, though, Westerkamp was forced to leave the WSP because of gender discrimination. Her enthusiastic and committed contributions to the group’s research inexplicably caused problems within the group, she says. Refusing to be deterred, Westerkamp decided to strike out on her own as an independent artist.

You have to trust your own inner voice. Listen to where your passion is located.
— Hildegard Westerkamp

Bhumber arrived in the industry at a very different time, not long before the rise of #MeToo and what has become a wholesale reconsideration of gender and gender discrimination in the workplace.

But while the example of women like Westerkamp and the hard work of generations of feminist activists have opened up the conversation about equality, and while the move to digital production has opened up the industry to people of different backgrounds, women remain greatly underrepresented.

Particularly, Bhumber says, women of colour: “There was never someone that looked like me growing up, there was never anyone that I could relate to identity-wise,” she says. “It’s tough because it’s not just music production, all these tech fields are male-dominated it’s not just music production itself.”

Her experience within the Digital Performance Systems class (SUBclass) that reignited her interest in music technology is an exception, she says. 

“I think [because it’s an interdisciplinary program] you are going to get people coming from different backgrounds, including gender. So I think that’s one of the main reasons, because if it was just an engineering or music tech engineering group it might not be that diverse.”

Bhumber and Westerkamp believe that greater equality is inevitable, but change depends not just on movements but on individuals. 

Westerkamp’s advice for young women starting out in music? Trust your own internal voice: “Listen to where your passion is located, where your skill is located and how that resonates with which part of society. Trust your own ears, trust your own inclination on, especially for women, where your interests lie.” 

Rethinking the canon

Music by women composers represent only a small part of the Western canon, in spite of important contributions which date back to at least the Middle Ages. A new project by UBC faculty and alumni is helping to change that.
 

By Graham MacDonald

LaurelParsons02.jpg

UBC School of Music's Dr. Laurel Parsons (MA’91, PhD’03) and Dr. Brenda Ravenscroft (PhD’93) of McGill University are the editors of Analytical Essays on Music by Women Composers, a four-volume series of essays devoted to the study of music written by women composers. The first volume, which features essays on concert music composed between 1960 and 2000, recently won the Society for Music Theory’s 2018 award for Outstanding Multi-Author Publication. With the release of the second volume fast approaching, we sat down with Parsons to discuss the project.
 

Laurel, how did the project come about?

I did my dissertation on the music of Elisabeth Lutyens, who was a British composer. I started reading about how influential she was on British music of the time, but I couldn’t find anything more specific about how she was influential. I decided I would explore her music for my dissertation. At the same time, I started noticing how few papers there were on music by women. After tracking this for many years, it became clear to me that we had to do something to improve the representation of composers who were women in our discipline.

When complete, there will be four volumes of essays on approximately 35 composers from the middle ages, with Hildegard of Bingen, up to 2014. The four volumes will be mostly 20th and 21st century music, but the volume that we have coming up will be music from the middle ages to 1900. Our final volume will be electro acoustic, experimental, and multimedia music.

 

In the first volume you write that, between 1994 and 2013, only 23 out of 1524 papers published in eight peer-reviewed journals were about music composed by women. How did you interpret these numbers?

We weren’t surprised at all because we’ve been tracking them informally for years. This confirmed what we already knew. Although it’s rather stark when you start looking at numbers like this – even 23 seemed like more than we expected.

 

Can you talk about what your experience was like as a music student and, what kinds of music tend to make up the classical canon?

 Dr. Brenda Ravenscroft, left, and Dr. Laurel Parsons, right

Dr. Brenda Ravenscroft, left, and Dr. Laurel Parsons, right

There’s so much wonderful music that you learn as a student and there’s so much wonderful music that you learn in university. Not to take anything away from that, but once you start looking for music by women, or people who are not white men, in particular because classical music is such a Eurocentric discipline, it really becomes shocking to see how narrow that representation of composers really is. It wasn’t that women weren’t composing; there is a long history of women composing from the Middle Ages until now. But they definitely were composing less frequently than men because they didn’t have the same opportunities.

 

Each essay begins with a biography of the composer. How important is biography to this project, and what role does it play in how we listen to this music?

Many people have not heard of these composers, so it was necessary to provide a little bit of background on who these women were. The more we did this, the more we have seen how extraordinary these women were, and are. For example, when we go through music school, we’re often taught about Clara [Schumann, nee] Wieck as a young woman having this domineering father — Friedrich Wieck — and the influence he had on her relationship with Robert Schumann. But we never hear about her mother. In reading Nancy Reich’s book on legendary concert pianist and composer Clara Schumann, we learned that Clara’s mother had briefly performed as a concert pianist. After the birth of her fifth child, she took Clara and the baby and left what may have been an abusive marriage, but Friedrich forcibly retrieved the children and raised them himself. So Clara’s mother had been an extraordinary musician in her own right, but it’s a remarkable part of the story that we never hear. We also want to highlight these women independently of their husbands, or their brothers. It’s often the way we hear about these women. 

 

Is the balance of representation changing in music scholarship?

It is changing a little bit, but it is still slow to change. So we would like to move it along. What we’re hoping with this project is that it provides ideas for music theory instructors in university music programs to come up with their own lesson plans based on these chapters, so they can incorporate them into their classes. And we hope that radio broadcasters might use this as a sourcebook of ideas for programming and giving them ideas about what they might say about the work that they’re broadcasting.

 

What is the impact that you hope for this project?
We see ourselves as contributing to a larger movement. There are many people involved in the cycle that is musical activity. You have teachers, you have students, you have performers, you have broadcasters, you have listeners. There are lots of places you can enter that cycle. So as music theorists, this is what we can do. We hope to inspire more activity and it’s great to see some of that happening. There are websites now, musictheoryexamplesbywomen.com for example, where theory instructors who want to incorporate music by women into their courses can find score examples of various compositional techniques. It’s exciting to see those online resources happening, and it’s exciting to see concerts of music by women.

We began this project as a kind of compensatory analysis, trying to rectify an imbalance.  Through this we’ve learned about so many composers we had never heard of,  and we’ve heard so much music that we didn’t know was out there. It’s been tremendously exciting for us to hear this fresh repertoire that we feel anybody can to enjoy,  and we should be hearing this music, not in order to create some political balance, because it’s really good music! It’s an exciting venture of discovery, not just political duty.  We want to share that with our readers and with anyone who’s interested in discovering what they’ve been missing.
 

Watch out Dr. Parsons and Prof. Ravenscroft on the next episode of On That Note, the School of Music podcast, out later this month.

Winter concerts on Livestream

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Watch the latest performances by the School of Music’s large and small ensembles on Livestream!

 

St. John Passion: Our grand, season-ending concert features an epic performance of the Bach masterpiece by UBC Choirs and Symphony Orchestra.

Peter and the Wolf: UBC Symphony Orchestra performs the Prokofiev classic, along with Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite and selections from Satie and Poulenc. With guest appearances by UBC President Prof. Santa J. Ono as Narrator.

Sanglots: Chansons of Love and Loss (Part 1 | Part 2): Terence Dawson, piano, and J. Patrick Raftery, voice, perform beautiful and melancholy works by Bizet, Fauré, Duparc, Barber and Poulenc.  

MOMENTmusic: UBC Symphonic Winds and Concert Winds perform works by John Philip Sousa, Frank Ticheli, David Maslanka, Ira Hearshen, and Aaron Copland

Bernstein, Prokofiev, Nielsen: UBC Symphony Orchestra performs Overture to Candide, Piano Concerto No. 3 in C Major Op. 26, and Symphony No. 4 Op 29. With special guests Carter Johnson, winner of the 2018 UBC Concerto Competition, and Graduate Assistant Conductor Jaelem Bhate.

Unicornis Captivatur: UBC Choirs perform Mendelssohn, Sisak, Mozart, Gjeilo, Gabrieli and Paulus. 

World premieres, new commissions, a Juno nomination, and more

 Stephanie Nakagawa.  Photo: UBC

Stephanie Nakagawa. Photo: UBC

Awards, announcements and other news from our alumni
 

In November, Stephanie Nakagawa (BMus’09, DMA’17) received a Barbara Pentland Award from the Canadian Music Centre BC for her remarkable doctoral project, The Canadian Opera Anthology for Soprano.
 

Nicole Linaksita (BMus/BSc’16) was named as a finalist in the 2018 Shean Piano Competition. The finals will take place May 17–19, 2018 in Muttart Hall, Alberta College in Edmonton, Alberta. 


Composer and saxophonist Colin MacDonald (BMus’93) premiered The Sky Is a Clock, his ambitious, hour-long audio installation at the Roundhouse Community Centre in November 2017. Presented by Redshift Music as part of its “Sonologues” series, Colin’s piece interweaves recordings of 16 saxophones to “create a pulsating and slowly evolving texture of sound that mimics the rotation of the stars in the sky.”

 

 Jared Miller.  Photo: CBC

Jared Miller. Photo: CBC

Jared Miller (BMus’10) was commissioned by the Detroit Symphony Orchestra (DSO) to create a new work inspired by classic techno music. DSO and Leonard Slatkin will perform the piece for the very first time on May 31st and June 2nd, 2018 along with works by Chopin and Stravinsky. CBC News recently profiled Jared.


Composer Michael Oesterle (BMus’92) wrote a new work for the Sea and Sky Trio, which they performed as part of the Vetta Chamber Music concerts in Vancouver in March.
 

Producer and recording engineer Will Howie (BMus’04) recently published a new article on “Listener Discrimination Between Common Speaker-based 3D Audio Reproduction Formats” in AES Journal and delivered a paper on three-dimensional audio recording techniques for orchestra at the 142nd convention of the Audio Engineering Society in Berlin.

 Fraser Walters

Fraser Walters

Fraser Walters (BMus’03) and his group The Tenors were nominated for a 2018 Juno Award in the category of Adult Contemporary Album of the Year for Christmas Together, which “captures the joy and magic of the season, combining a mix of holiday classics, contemporary favourites and original songs.” This was The Tenors' third Juno nomination — they won in the same category in 2013.
 

Kristin Fung (BMus’07) has had a busy year, to say the least. She debuted her experimental vocal/movement trio, Celeste, at the Aga Khan Museum in Toronto; recorded with free jazz master Anthony Braxton in New York; worked as a wedding singer in Hong Kong; and taught ukulele in parks across Toronto as part of the city’s “Arts in the Parks” initiative — as well as in Bermuda.

 

Cellist, composer and Erato Ensemble member Stefan Hintersteininger (BMus’04, MLis’09) recently premiered arrangements of songs by 50’s cult singer-songwriter Connie Converse at the group’s POP ART! concert at the Orpheum Annex in Vancouver. 


Lani Krantz (BMus’00) became Acting Principal Harp with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in January.

 Samatha Ballard

Samatha Ballard


Samantha Ballard (BMus’15) released her first solo album, On Christmas Night, on iTunes and Google Play. Twice a month she also posts new arrangements and covers on her YouTube channel, which has attracted over three million views to date.


James Mitchell (BMus’82) has produced a video with the National Library of Scotland to mark the March 25th centenary of the death of Claude Debussy (1862-1918).

 

Stephanie Bell (BMus’14) recently won the 2nd flute and piccolo position with the Victoria Symphony Orchestra. Stephanie studies with Brenda Fedoruk.

 

Two UBC Music alumni, Kathleen Allan (BMus’11) and John William Trotter (BMus’98), have been named to the shortlist for artistic director of the Vancouver Chamber Choir

The Gift of Music

  Photo: Dina MacDougall

Photo: Dina MacDougall

The School of Music unveils rare, newly refurbished harpsichord — thanks to support from a generous donor.

This March, the School of Music unveiled one of the jewels of our instrument collection: a newly renovated double-manual harpsichord modeled on an 18th-century German original. Harpsichordist Alexander Weimann, along with violinist Chloe Meyers and viola da gamba player Natalie Mackie, showcased the new addition with a special concert at Roy Barnett Recital Hall featuring the works of German Baroque composers.

“Bach, Muffat, Buxtehude and Schmeltzer — it was the perfect repertoire, I think, to demonstrate what makes the instrument such an important and beautiful addition to the School,” says Professor Alex Fisher, who helped organize the renovation and the concert. 

 

 

LISTEN: Bach's Sonata in G major for gamba and harpsichord, as performed by Alexander Weimann (harpsichord) and Natalie Mackie (viola da gamba)

Craftsman Craig Tomlinson built the harpsichord by hand in the 1980s, based on the original German design by Christian Zell (1728) that is preserved today in the Museum of Arts and Crafts in Hamburg. Celebrated for its rich sound and variety of different tone colours, Tomlinson’s masterful replica had begun to show its age and needed some significant improvements.

A generous donation by Marlene Yemchuk, in honour of her son David Yemchuk (B.Sc. 2010), made the renovation possible.

“In the fall of 2016 Marlene and I began discussing a donation in the memory of David, an alumnus of the UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, who was an avid and talented musician in his own right,” Fisher says.

“After consulting with a variety of local performers and experts, we decided that the donation’s greatest impact would be to fully renovate the Zell harpsichord, which over the years had fallen into disrepair.”

 

 

LISTEN: Buxtehude's Sonata in A minor for violin, viola da gamba, and continuo, as performed by Weimann, Mackie, and Chloe Meyers (violin)

In addition, the generous donation also made possible some improvements to a second harpsichord by Ken Bakeman that is heavily used by students and faculty.

In his renovation of the Zell harpsichord, Tomlinson kept its original case, its lovely keyboards made of ebony and bone, and its beautifully painted soundboard, but completely restored the harpsichord’s action. He restrung the entire instrument, adjusting its regulation and voicing, rebuilt the stand on which it rests, and painted the entire exterior of the instrument in a deep black with gold bands. The finishing touch was the addition of a small plaque in David’s memory, inscribed with the phrase Musica Lieta Dono Divino (“Joyful Music: The Divine Gift”).

The result is, in Weimann and Fisher’s opinion, perhaps the finest instrument of its kind in Vancouver and the entire region.

“As a musician and devotee of early music, I can say that it an incredible gift to have such an important and beautiful instrument at the School. Thank you to Marlene and Craig!” Weimann says.

* * *

As one of the most beautiful instruments in the region, the Zell harpsichord needs a custom-made cover that will protect it from scuffs and scrapes and keep it in top condition. If there are early music enthusiasts out there who might be interested in making a small donation towards this commission, we would be extremely grateful for any support!

Please contact Prof. Fisher if you're interested.

 

 

SLIDESHOW: A closer look at the renovated harpsichord

Catching Up With Our Students

 Carter Johnson

Carter Johnson

BMus student Carter Johnson won the 2018 UBC Concerto Competition for his performance of Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 3 in C Major, Op. 26, with MMus student Carlos Savall-Guardiola taking second prize for his rendition of Francaix’s Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra, Op. 36. Watch Carter perform his concerto with the UBC Symphony Orchestra here.
 

Fourth-year BMus student Kurt Ward-Theiss, baritone, and first-year BMus student Jonathan Lopez, clarinet, received bursaries from the Vancouver Welsh Men’s Choir. Kurt and Jonathan performed in the Vancouver Welsh Men’s Choir Celtic concerts on St. Patrick’s Day weekend in Maple Ridge and at Christ Church Cathedral. The Vancouver Welsh Men’s Choir Student Bursaries advance the ensemble’s mission of collaborating with and supporting youth choirs and soloists in our community.

 Antares Boyle

Antares Boyle

PhD candidate Antares Boyle won the Society for Music Theory’s prestigious SMT-40 Dissertation Fellowship for her dissertation project, “Formation and Process in Repetitive Post-Tonal Music,” which theorizes how musical segments, processes, and larger forms arise in recent post-tonal works that feature extensive varied repetition. The $3500 fellowship recognizes and fosters excellent research in music theory by helping highly qualified Ph.D. students to complete their dissertations.

 

DMA student Emily Logan and Faculty of Medicine student Danielle Olmstead will present their abstract titled “Injury management and health care access in university-level musicians and athletes: a comparative study” at the 2018 Performing Arts Medicine Association’s International Symposium at Chapman University this summer. Emily studies with Prof. Terence Dawson.
 

 Mia Gazley

Mia Gazley

This winter, BMus student and saxophonist Mia Gazley won the Pacific Symphonic Wind Ensemble (PSWE)’s Youth Soloist Competition! Mia will perform with PSWE at Evergreen Cultural Centre on June 9th, 2018. She was also one of eight recipients of the Faces of Today Award at UBC’s Student Leadership Conference in January. The awards “recognize outstanding student leaders for their sustained leadership achievements and their efforts to innovate, improve and shape the life on and off campus.”

 

DMA student Benjamin Hopkins won the grand prize at the inaugural Robert and Ellen Silverman Piano Concerto Competition in March! Nine students competed in a thrilling evening of piano concertos at Roy Barnett Recital Hall, with second prize going to DMA student Evgenia Rabinovich, third prize to BMus student Ayunia Saputro, and fourth prize to BMus student Aydan Con. The prizewinners will perform with the UBC Symphony Orchestra on September 23rd, 2018 at the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts. Benjamin will perform his winning interpretation of Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 4, while the other prize winners will have the opportunity to play at least one movement of their concerto with the orchestra.
 

 Carlos Savall-Guardiola

Carlos Savall-Guardiola

Carlos Savall-Guardiola won the 2018 Royal Over-Seas UK Scholarship for a BC Emerging Musician. Auditions were held in Barnett Hall on Saturday, January 20. This summer, as part of his scholarship, Carlos will perform in London and at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. He will also receive lessons from prominent teachers in the UK. 


BMus student Liel Amdour won the Ben Steinberg Musical Legacy Award, which is presented annually by Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto to a promising young Jewish artist (instrumentalist or vocalist). The prize is $2,500 and a concert recital in Toronto. As Liel points out, “It is extra exciting because my teacher at UBC, Dr. Daniel Bolshoy, received this award in 1996. He has been a fantastic supporter of my journey.” Liel’s concert will happen on June 13th, 2018 in Toronto. She will also play a recital for the Vancouver Classical Guitar Society Emerging Artist Series on May 19th.


BA (Music) student Chantelle Ko received the Interdisciplinary Award at the recent UBC Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research Conference for her innovative Touch Responsive Augmented Violin Interface System (TRAVIS), the capstone project for her minor in Applied Music Technology. For the project, supervised by Dr. Bob Pritchard, Chantelle added soft potentiometers and force sensing resistors to one of her violins, for the control of audio and video triggering, synthesis and processing, while using traditional performance techniques.


PhD student John Lai presented his conference paper “Lotus, Blossom, and Dream: Octatonicism in Toshio Hosokawa’s Lotus under the Moonlight: Hommage à Mozart” at the West Coast Conference of Music Theory and Analysis in April at San Diego State University.
 

* * * 

Students in the School of Music’s Ethnomusicology Department have been incredibly busy. Following is news of four PhD students in ethnomusicology who are all currently immersed in writing dissertations as well as involved in various kinds of public culture and performance projects outside of their academic work. Their activities testify to UBC School of Music’s presence in many kinds of musical and cultural scenes worldwide. 

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Bali, Indonesia
Jonathan Adams
and current visiting artist I Putu Gede Sukaryana (Balot) co-founded Insitu Recordings on the island of Bali in September 2016. Since the project launched, they have released 14 albums of new and traditional gamelan music. This includes five volumes in their unique Insitu Sessions series, which are recorded and released in HD video. In February of this year they launched a companion digital publication: Insitu Recordings Magazine. The magazine gives greater context to the wider world of gamelan music, exploring imagined centers as much as their peripheries, and is a medium through which established voices can be shared with younger people and/or those outside the rather inward-looking realm of Balinese gamelan. The first issue can be viewed here. The project was recently featured on Nerhera Sounds SOAS Radio London, which can be streamed here.

 
 Julia Ulehla

Julia Ulehla

Czech Republic
PhD student Julia Ulehla leads the Dálava project with her husband, guitarist Aram Bajakian (MMus’17). Dálava is an homage to traditional Moravian (Czech) folksong, sourcing melodies transcribed over 100 years ago by Julia’s great-grandfather Vladimir and reanimating them in an avant-garde, post-rock musical language. With support from UBC’s Public Scholars Initiative, Dálava recently released a new record called The Book of Transfigurations (Songlines Recordings, April 2017) that has garnered considerable critical acclaim: “Every now and then an album appears that is so overwhelming and so intense that it is hard to put into any category….. Saying that The Book of Transfigurations is a masterpiece is not an exaggeration” (Bas Springer, fRoots, August 2017). The Province included Dálava on its “10 best live concerts in Vancouver” list, while The Chicago Reader’s Peter Margasak named The Book of Transfigurations one of his top 40 records of the year. In October, Julia was invited to speak about Dálava at Womex in Katowice, Poland, where she also gave interviews for the BBC and Norwegian Radio. Dálava will appear at several major international music festivals in 2018.

 
 Eshantha Peiris

Eshantha Peiris

Sri Lanka
Before coming to UBC to study ethnomusicology in 2014, Eshantha Peiris co-founded the after-school music education program Musicmatters in Colombo, Sri Lanka. One of the projects initiated by the staff of Musicmatters was the Transcoastal Collective; this collaboration with musicians from the formerly war-torn district of Batticaloa was inspired by the folk music of that region. Eshantha’s current research examines the social history of a Sri Lankan tradition of ritual drumming that has undergone changes in musical vocabulary in the twentieth century. 

 
 Curtis Andrews.  Photo: UBC

Curtis Andrews. Photo: UBC

Ghana
Curtis Andrews
 has been connecting to communities in Ghana since his first visit there in 1999. He is currently based in the village of Dagbamete, in southeastern Ghana, where, for his PhD dissertation, he is studying the connections between vodu, music, and culture. Curtis has been supporting educational development in the area since 2007, co-founding the Dzogadze Education Development Foundation, which assists deserving students with their educational needs.

Beyond the Gates

The latest news from School of Music faculty

Assistant Professor and Director of Orchestras Jonathan Girard has been named a Peter Wall Institute Wall Scholar for 2018–19. As one of nine scholars “tasked with finding new approaches to critically important questions,” Dr. Girard will work with 2017 Peter Wall Institute Visiting Artist Deborah Carruthers on a graphical score for orchestra, and has plans to commission new orchestral works that explore sonic expressions of climate change.

 Prof. Nancy Hermiston (right) at Canada Music Week

Prof. Nancy Hermiston (right) at Canada Music Week

In November, the Canadian Music Centre honoured Professor Nancy Hermiston with a Barbara Pentland Award of Excellence for the UBC Opera’s many commissions, performances, and support of Canadian music.


Composer and Sessional Instructor Jocelyn Morlock (MMus’96, DMA’02) won the 2018 Juno Award for Classical Composition of the Year for her orchestral work, My Name Is Amanda Todd. The 10-minute composition honours the memory of the Port Coquitlam teenager who died tragically in 2015. Watch Jocelyn and Carol Todd, Amanda’s mother, talk about the piece, and her daughter's legacy.

WATCH: Jocelyn Morlock's Juno Award speech

Sessional instructor and harpsichordist Alexander Weimann was nominated alongside Arion Orchestre Baroque for the Juno Award for Classical Album of the Year (Large Ensemble). Their album, Rebelles Baroques, is hailed for the "clarity and freshness of [its] interpretations" and attention to detail. Weimann is the Principal Artist and Director of the School of Music's Baroque Orchestra Mentorship Program.


Sessional lecturer and saxophonist Julia Nolan joined the West Coast Symphony Orchestra for its 2018 Balkan Tour, which includes stops in Albania, Macedonia, Kosovo, and Montenegro.  The tour will feature music by composers from Canada, the United States, Kosovo and Macedonia, including a reprise of Saxophone Concerto by composer and alumnus Stefan Hintersteininger (BMus’04, MLis’09).


Adjunct professor Elizabeth Volpé Bligh retired from her position as Principal Harp with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in January 2018, after 36 years. Her former student Lani Krantz (BMus’00) became Acting Principal Harp in her place, until auditions can be held for the role. Bligh will also continue to perform with the VSO occasionally.

In Pictures: UBC Opera's 2017–18 season

The 2017–18 season has been a busy one for UBC Opera, with ambitious productions of Gluck's Orfeo ed Euridice and Rossini's La Cenerentola, as well the annual Opera Ball fundraisers. Here are some of the highlights:

Join UBC Opera for the upcoming production of Puccini’s Il Tabarro/Gianni Schicchi on June 21–24, 2018.

New research and publications

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Professor Alexander Fisher contributed a chapter entitled "'Mit singen und klingen': Urban Processional Culture and the Soundscapes of Post-Reformation Germany" to In Listening to Early Modern Catholicism, edited by Daniele V. Filippi and Michael Noone, 187-203. Leiden: Brill, 2017.

Prof. Fisher also presented a number of talks: "Bells and Apotropaic Magic in Reformation Germany" at the Early Modern Research Cluster, University of British Columbia, in December; "Shattering the Lightning: Bells and Magic in Reformation Germany" as part of the series Worlds of Wonder at Green College, UBC in February; and “Musicalische Friedens-Freud: The Westphalian Peace and Music in Protestant Nuremberg" at Rethinking Europe: War and Peace in the Early Modern German Lands, the triennial meeting of Frühe Neuzeit Interdiziplinär in St. Louis this March.


Professor John Roeder gave a keynote address, entitled “Comparing Musical Cycles Across the World,” at the 2018 Rocky Mountain Music Scholars Conference in Tucson, Arizona. He gave two talks at the Society for Music Theory’s annual conference: “Interactions of Folk Melody and Transformational (Dis)continuities in Chen Yi’s Ba Ban” and “How to create meter and why.” Prof. Roeder also guest lectured at the Eastman Theory Colloquium at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York.
 

Assistant Professor Ève Poudrier presented a talk entitled “The Influence of Grouping and Tempo on Subjective Metricization” at the recent Auditory Perception, Cognition and Action Meeting in Vancouver this past November. 
 

Professor David Metzer presented a new talk, “Ballads: A History of Emotions in Popular Culture,” at South By Southwest (SXSW) in Austin, Texas this March. Adapted from his latest book, The Ballad in American Popular Music: From Elvis to Beyoncé, the talk explored how feelings are understood and experienced in popular culture at particular moments through the lens of soul and power ballads.
 

The School of Music’s Rhythm Research Cluster held two symposia this term. The first, “Modeling Rhythmic Complexity, explored intersecting tools and methodologies from the fields of music information retrieval, computational analysis, and experimental psychology, for application to the study of complex rhythmic structures. The second, “Microtiming and Musical Motion,” explored some of the “kinetic aspects of microtiming—including groove and flow in popular music—as well as some new methods and compositional applications of microtiming analysis.”

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Assistant Professor Claudio Vellutini received a UBC Hampton Endowment Research Fund New Faculty Award for his book project, “Entangled Histories: Opera and Cultural Networks between Vienna and the Italian States, 1815–1848.” He also published an essay, "Opera and Monuments: Verdi's Ernani in Vienna and the Construction of Dynastic Memory,” in the Cambridge Opera Journal.
 

Dr. Brandon Konoval presented his paper “The Disenchanted Flute? Music, Max Weber, and Early Modern Science" at the Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science in Toronto last May. His article "Pythagorean Pipe Dreams? Vincenzo Galilei, Marin Mersenne, and the Pneumatic Mysteries of the Pipe Organ" appeared in the February 2018 issue of Perspectives on Science.

New recordings

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Two new compositions by Professor Keith Hamel — “Touch” and “Corona” — appear on Music4Eyes+Ears, a multimedia project created by pianist Megumi Masaki. The project “explores how sound, image, text and movement can interact in live performance.”

Watch the album trailer

 

Professor Stephen Chatman released Dawn of Night (CMC Centrediscs, 2017), a collaboration with Conductor Hilary Apfelstadt and the University of Toronto’s Macmillan Singers that weds original music with the poetry of Joanna Lilley, Christina Rossetti, Sarah Teasdale, and Tara Wohlberg and others.

Listen to Dawn of Night (Spotify)

 
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Composer and sessional instructor Jocelyn Morlock (MMus’96, DMA’02)’s new album, Halcyon (CMC Centrediscs), features a who’s who of great Canadian musicians, including baritone Tyler Duncan (BMus’98), cellists Ariel Barnes and Joseph Elworthy, conductor Leslie Dala (MMus’96), pianists Corey Hamm and Erika Switzer (BMus’97, MMus’00), vibraphonist Vern Griffiths (BCom’90, BMus’94), violinist Nicholas Write, and soprano Robyn Driedger-Klassen (BMus’00). Morlock’s new piece “Petrichor” appears on Duo Concertante's Incarnation, and her Juno Award-winning composition “My Name Is Amanda Todd” appears on the National Arts Centre’s Life Reflected. 

Listen to Halcyon (Spotify)

 
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Also in December, Sessional lecturer Alan Matheson and Wade Mikkola released the second volume of their Souvenirs project, a collection of jazz interpretations of Finnish composers, on AMK Recordings.

Listen to Souvenirs (Spotify)

 

 

The Vancouver-based saxophone quartet Saxophilia, featuring sessional lecturer Julia Nolan and alumnus Colin MacDonald (BMus ’93), released their debut self-titled album in December on Redshift Records. The album includes compositions by Professor Dorothy Chang, alumnus Peter Hannan (BMus ’75), John Burke, and Colin MacDonald. Listen to Saxophilia (Spotify)


Julia Nolan also appears on Chor Leoni Men’s Choir’s new album, Wandering Heart, on Elektra Women’s Choir’s latest, Your One and Only Life, and on Sea and Sky Ensemble's Chromaticity.

Composer Denis Bedard’s new album, Works for Organ and Other Instruments, features Nolan on saxophone and Katherine Evans, the School of Music’s Manager of Admissions, on trumpet.