colorbar_orange_horiz.jpg
 

SYMPOSIUM 3: "Microtiming and Musical Motion"

March 6-9, 2018

Musical microtiming refers to small-scale rhythmic irregularities and asynchronies, mostly on the order of 50–250 milliseconds. Such phenomena can have a profound effect on how music feels to the listener, including the qualities of motion that it evokes. This symposium explores some of these kinetic aspects of microtiming—including groove and flow in popular music—as well as some new methods and compositional applications of microtiming analysis.

 

Organizer:

Dr. Alan Dodson (School of Music, University of British Columbia).

 

Guest Speakers:

Dr. Richard Beaudoin (Dartmouth College)

Dr. Mitch Ohriner (University of Denver)

Dr. Olivier Senn (Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts)


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Tuesday, March 6, 2018, 12–1 pm, Room 400B, School of Music, University of British Columbia

Title: Microtiming as a Compositional Material

Presenter: Richard Beaudoin (Dartmouth College)

Abstract: Presentation for composition seminar.

 Richard Beaudoin

Richard Beaudoin

About the Presenter:

Richard Beaudoin (Dartmouth College) is a composer whose music and writings explore compositional uses of microtiming. He taught composition and theory at Harvard University for eight years (2008-16), was a Visiting Research Fellow at the Royal Academy of Music, London (2016-17), and has also held the post of Valentine Visiting Professor of Music at Amherst College. His work has been performed by artists and ensembles including Roomful of Teeth, Claire Chase, Dashon Burton, Mark Knoop, Annette Dasch, the Chiara and Kreutzer String Quartets, Konzerthaus Dortmund, Staatstheater Kassel, and Boston Lyric Opera.

A recent interview: http://www.classicagenda.fr/richard-beaudoin-microtiming/

 

 

Tuesday, March 6, 2018, 1–2:15 pm, Room 400B, School of Music, University of British Columbia         

Title: Introducing LARA

Presenter: Olivier Senn (Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts)

Abstract: LARA is a software tool for microtiming analysis. The workshop introduces students to LARA and presents methods for measuring note onsets and visualizing the timing pattern of a musical performance. The discussion will focus on short passages from Rubinstein’s and Richter’s recordings of Chopin's Mazurka Op. 24 No. 2.

Workshop materials: Participants who wish to have a more hands-on experience should come to the workshop with LARA pre-installed on their laptops. Participants can also prepare by reviewing Senn, Kilchenmann & Camp (2012), “A Turbulent Acceleration into the Stretto”.

 Olivier Senn

Olivier Senn

About the Presenter:

Olivier Senn (Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts) studied Musicology, Philosophy and German Linguistics at the University of Zurich (Switzerland); he currently studies Statistics and Applied Mathematics at the Open University (UK). He is professor for music research at the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, where he helped develop a sophisticated tool for microtiming analysis, the Lucerne Audio Recording Analyzer (LARA). His research interests include the psychology of groove, the analysis of musical interpretation, and the history of jazz and improvised music.

 

 

 

Thursday, March 8, 2018, 1–2:15 pm, Room 400B, School of Music, University of British Columbia         

Title: The Rhythm of Speech, Music, and Rap Music

Presenter: Mitch Ohriner (University of Denver)

Abstract: This workshop will introduce techniques for annotating, visualizing, and interpreting timing in performances of rap music. A very brief introduction to the rhythm of speech signals will precede a discussion of the rhythmic delivery of the emcee Talib Kweli, focusing on the 2002 track “Get By”.

Workshop materials: TBA.

 Mitch Ohriner

Mitch Ohriner

About the Presenter:

Mitchell Ohriner completed his PhD in music theory at Indiana University in 2011, having previously studied composition at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Since, he has taught music theory at Washington University in St. Louis, MO and Shenandoah University in Winchester, VA. His research is in two tracks: his dissertation and first several articles explores the phenomenon of expressive timing — the subtle differences in "clock duration" between musical events nominally the same length. In the past two years, he has turned his attention to the intersection of theories of rhythm in meter versus rhythm in speech in rap music, especially in regards to what emcees call "flow." All this work is united by a focus on rhythmic perception and the use of computational methods. Dr. Ohriner has presented at national and international conferences on music theory and has published in Music Theory Online, Empirical Musicology Review, and the Indiana Theory Review, as well as in the proceedings of conferences on Performance Science and Mathematics and Computation in Music.

 

Thursday, March 8, 2018, 5–6 pm, Coach House, Green College, University of British Columbia

Title: What in Music Makes Us Dance?: Recent Developments in Groove Studies

Presenter: Olivier Senn (Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts)

Abstract: Humans love to synchronize body movement with rhythmic music: dancing, exercising, and even ironing a shirt are much more enjoyable when we carry them out to a good tune. Groove research investigates factors that influence our urge to entrain body movement to music: researchers ask why many of us would rather dance to Stevie Wonder’s “Superstition” than to the Beatles’ “Yesterday,” even though we might appreciate both songs equally from an aesthetic point of view. This presentation explores the phenomenon of groove from an empirical perspective by discussing a recent listening experiment in which participants assessed the entrainment qualities of popular music drum patterns..

 Olivier Senn

Olivier Senn

About the Presenter

Olivier Senn (Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts) studied Musicology, Philosophy and German Linguistics at the University of Zurich (Switzerland); he currently studies Statistics and Applied Mathematics at the Open University (UK). He is professor for music research at the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, where he helped develop a sophisticated tool for microtiming analysis, the Lucerne Audio Recording Analyzer (LARA). His research interests include the psychology of groove, the analysis of musical interpretation, and the history of jazz and improvised music.

 

 

 

Thursday, March 8, 2018, 8–9 pm, Piano Lounge, Graham House, Green College, University of British Columbia

Program: Two works by Dr. Richard Beaudoin (Dartmouth College)

Performers: Paolo Bortolussi (flute) and Réa Beaumont (piano)

 Richard Beaudoin

Richard Beaudoin

About the Composer

Richard Beaudoin (Dartmouth College) is a composer whose music and writings explore compositional uses of microtiming. He taught composition and theory at Harvard University for eight years (2008-16), was a Visiting Research Fellow at the Royal Academy of Music, London (2016-17), and has also held the post of Valentine Visiting Professor of Music at Amherst College. His work has been performed by artists and ensembles including Roomful of Teeth, Claire Chase, Dashon Burton, Mark Knoop, Annette Dasch, the Chiara and Kreutzer String Quartets, Konzerthaus Dortmund, Staatstheater Kassel, and Boston Lyric Opera.

A recent interview: http://www.classicagenda.fr/richard-beaudoin-microtiming/

 

 

Friday, March 9, 2018, 3:30–5 pm (with reception to follow), Room 116 (Gessler Hall), School of Music, University of British Columbia

Title: “Microtiming and Musical Motion”: Four Lightning Talks plus Discussion

Presenters:

1. Olivier Senn (Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts): "The effect of microtiming on groove"
2. Mitch Ohriner (University of Denver): "Expressive speech and expressive timing in Kendrick Lamar"
3. Alan Dodson (University of British Columbia): "Microtiming and experiential meter"
4. Richard Beaudoin (Dartmouth College): "Composing with borrowed time"

 

 

 

Sponsors:

Microtiming symposium sponsors.JPG