Research and Publications: Rossini, 'Repeated Borrowing,' and RRC residencies

Balinese composer Dewa Alit

Balinese composer Dewa Alit

The Rhythm Research Cluster (RRC) closed its initial funded period with two exciting residences that brought innovative Balinese composer Dewa Alit, and the popular music scholar Anne Danielsen, director of the RITMO Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies in Rhythm, Time and Motion (Norwegian Centre of Excellence, Oslo) to the School of Music. Organized by Prof. Michael Tenzer, Alit’s residence culminated with a public performance at Western Front by School of Music students and alumni of works by Alit and others — including the world premiere of Alit’s RRC-commissioned work, “Simalakama.” During Danielsen’s residence, graduate students and faculty participated in a workshop on micro-rhythmic analysis; the residence closed with a Music Colloquium Series lecture on the impact of digitization on rhythm and groove in African-American popular music. 

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Prof. David Metzer published “Repeated Borrowing: The Case of ‘Es ist genug’” in the Journal of the American Musicological Society. The article explores “a group of songs that musicians have frequently taken up in creating new works, from the chanson ‘L’homme armé’ in Renaissance masses to ‘Apache’ in hip hop tracks… and provide[s] the first study of repeated borrowing and trace[s] it across centuries and genres.”

Prof. John Roeder published “Lines in Harmony: Types of Cooperation in Four Recent Chinese Compositions” (“和声中的声部线条:近期中国四部音乐作品中的声部协作类型” translated by Zheng Yan) in Music Research, the leading peer-reviewed academic journal of music theory in China. And, picking up on an item from the last issue of High Notes, Prof. Roeder’s keynote address to the Meter Symposium 3 in Sydney, Australia is now available to watch here. 

Dr. Brandon Konoval published a new article, "From Sexuality to Governmentality: The Oedipus Complex of Michel Foucault," in Modern Intellectual History. The article looks at how “Foucault's attention to classical texts—in particular the Oedipus Tyrannos of Sophocles and the Republic of Plato—thereby helped to clear a critical pathway through the conventional Marxism embraced by the “repressive hypothesis,” and to arrive at a Nietzschean genealogy of sexuality and power.”

Rossini

Rossini

Dr. Claudio Vellutini published a new essay, "Rossini's Operas in Vienna and the Politics of Translation, 1816-1822," in Gioachino Rossini 1868-2018, a new volume celebrating the 150th anniversary of Rossini's death (Pesaro, Italy: Fondazione Rossini, 2019). Dr. Vellutini also presented a paper on the composer, "Rossini's German Singers (Vienna, ca. 1817-1825)," at the international conference Beethoven und Rossini in ihrer Epoche organized by the Beethoven-Haus in Bonn and the University for Music and Dance in Cologne.